Training Makes a Difference for Defeating Stereotypes

People demonstrate reduced stereotype activation when they’ve received training. The results from the training task provide further evidence for the impact of practice on participants’ proficiency in negating stereotypes. This is according to a recent study by Kawakami, Davidio, Moll and Hermsen. An article, “Just say no (to stereotyping): effects of training in the negation of stereotypic associations on stereotype activation” had as its primary aim to examine the effect of training in negating stereotype associations on stereotype activation. Across 3 studies, participants received practice in negating stereotypes related to skinhead and racial categories.

The subsequent automatic activation of stereotypes was measured using either a primed Stroop task (Studies I and 2) or a person categorization task (Study 3). The results demonstrate that when receiving no training or training in a non-target category stereotype, participants exhibited spontaneous stereotype activation. After receiving an extensive amount of training related to a specific category, however, participants demonstrated reduced stereotype activation. The results from the training task provide further evidence for the impact of practice on participants’ proficiency in negating stereotypes.

Although this study didn’t use the Ouch! program, certainly this is substantiates the U of Cincinnati study and years of anecdotal evidence that supports the use of our own program, Ouch! That Stereotype Hurts.

More From Our Blog…

Embodying Ethical Leadership

Embodying Ethical Leadership

In an age when faith in our institutions—academic, corporate and government—is at an all-time low, it behooves leaders to “do the right thing.” Paraphrasing Charlamagne, “Right action is better than knowledge, but in order to do what is right, we must know what is...

read more
Right Where She Belongs

Right Where She Belongs

How Lisette Martinez creates an inclusive culture and a world of opportunity as Jefferson Health’s Executive Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer By Gina Miller The innate desire to belong The year was 1984 in Ypsilanti, Michigan when the world fractured in...

read more
The Accessibility Journey

The Accessibility Journey

Accessibility is typically about providing the ability to access a building, a vehicle or a service. In our world of online eLearning courses, accessibility means enabling all learners to engage with a course in the way they need and prefer in order to gain the...

read more
Microaggressions… We have a lot to Learn

Microaggressions… We have a lot to Learn

To be human is to be flawed, but our struggles have the remarkable potential to transform us.  By addressing our mistakes and remaining open to learning, we broaden our understanding, increase our empathy and build our capacity to do better the next time. ...

read more
Focus on DEIB to Thrive During the “Great Resignation”

Focus on DEIB to Thrive During the “Great Resignation”

The “Great Resignation” continues along its historic path with 47.8 million workers quitting their jobs in 2021, which represented a record-setting average of nearly 4 million each month.  As of March 2022, 8.6 million people quit their jobs this year. ...

read more